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Tales from Old Ireland

Tales from Old Ireland

Author:
Series: Myths & Tales, Folk Tales, Fables, & Legends
Genres: Fiction, Picture Books
Tags: Ages 3-5, Ages 5-8
ASIN: 1905236328
ISBN: 1905236328

This enchanting collection of favorite Irish folk tales deserves to be read aloud at every hearth. Tales from Old Ireland, described by Malachy Doyle in captivating language, the larger-than-life characters, dramatic landscapes, and magical happenings of all the tales.

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About the Book

This enchanting collection of favorite Irish folk tales deserves to be read aloud at every hearth. Tales from Old Ireland, described by Malachy Doyle in captivating language, the larger-than-life characters, dramatic landscapes, and magical happenings of all the tales, including the famous legend of the bewitched Children of Lir, are also brought vividly to life by the luminous art of Niamh Sharkey, making this a book that will transport readers to another world for many happy hours.

Learning Through Literature also recommends these Irish folk tales – Irish Fairy Tales, Fin M’Coul: The Giant of Knockmany Hill and Patrick: Patron Saint of Ireland.

About Malachy Doyle

Malachy was born in Ireland, went to college in England, brought up his children in Wales and has now returned to Ireland, where he lives on a tiny island off the coast of County Donegal.
After spells in advertising and as a special needs teacher, Malachy turned to writing children’s books. He has now had over 70 published and has won many prizes, including the Parent’s Choice Gold Award and the Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Award (for ‘Tales from Old Ireland’), the Nestle Children’s Book Silver Award (for ‘The Dancing Tiger’), the Tir na nOg Award (for ‘Georgie’) and the English Association Award (for ‘Cow’).

Review

“A very lively retelling of seven traditional Irish stories accompanied by striking stylised artwork from Niamh Sharkey (winner of the Mother Goose Award) – –Bookseller<br /><br />”In his cogent introduction, Doyle gives a succinct overview of the significance of storytelling in the Irish cultural tradition, linking it to the present by references to the government-sponsored systematic collection of tales in the mid-1930s…. The illustrations by Niamh Sharkey are two-dimensional abstractions, richly colored like illuminated manuscripts….[T]he book is a well-designed addition to folklore collections.” –Horn Book<br /><br />”This comic, tender collection of tales from the oral tradition will give adults as much pleasure to read aloud as it will give children to hear. Doyle has a lively prose style full of wonderfully idiomatic dialogue: one character, for instance, drinks so much he is left “as dumb as a haddock on Good Friday.’ Some of these stories of fairies and heroes are well known (Irish versions of The Swan Princess and Cinderella, for example). Less familiar ones introduce enjoyable characters such as Lusmore the melodious hunchback and Jack Doherty the tippling fisherman. The storytelling is a delight, but it is the pictures that make this book truly special. Sharkey’s palette of autumnal colours is exceptionally rich and luminous; she combines boldness with gentleness, and her humorous vision tames the monsters and endears us to the eccentrics. The collection ends with a cheeky self-referential joke: a story explaining how these tales were written down is illustrated by St Patrick carrying a copy of this very book under his arm.” —The Sunday Times (London)

“In his cogent introduction, Doyle gives a succinct overview of the significance of storytelling in the Irish cultural tradition, linking it to the present by references to the government-sponsored systematic collection of tales in the mid-1930s…. The illustrations by Niamh Sharkey are two-dimensional abstractions, richly colored like illuminated manuscripts….[T]he book is a well-designed addition to folklore collections.” –Horn Book

“This comic, tender collection of tales from the oral tradition will give adults as much pleasure to read aloud as it will give children to hear. Doyle has a lively prose style full of wonderfully idiomatic dialogue: one character, for instance, drinks so much he is left “as dumb as a haddock on Good Friday.’ Some of these stories of fairies and heroes are well known (Irish versions of The Swan Princess and Cinderella, for example). Less familiar ones introduce enjoyable characters such as Lusmore the melodious hunchback and Jack Doherty the tippling fisherman. The storytelling is a delight, but it is the pictures that make this book truly special. Sharkey’s palette of autumnal colours is exceptionally rich and luminous; she combines boldness with gentleness, and her humorous vision tames the monsters and endears us to the eccentrics. The collection ends with a cheeky self-referential joke: a story explaining how these tales were written down is illustrated by St Patrick carrying a copy of this very book under his arm.” –The Sunday Times (London)

Look Inside
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