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Along Came Galileo

Along Came Galileo

One of the most important figures to come out of the awakening world of the Renaissance was Galileo Galelei. Often referred to as the "Archimedes of his time"

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About the Book

Inside: Along Came Galileo

One of the most important figures to come out of the awakening world of the Renaissance was Galileo Galelei. Often referred to as the “Archimedes of his time” Galileo was forever asking questions.

Is it possible to measure heat? Is it possible to weigh air? Does the earth stand still or does it move? How fast do objects fall to the earth? His questions led to some of the most important answers of the scientific world and to his contributions to astronomy, physics, and mathematics.

Galileo also advanced the astronomical telescope and invented the compound microscope. He measured the rotation of the sun, invented the thermometer, a geometrical compass and the pendulum clock.

He was a man of faith, a lover of art and an accomplished artist. He played the lute and enjoyed working in his garden. He was the first to see, through the lens of the telescope, the wonders of our galaxy sights that moved him to profound gratitude to God.

He was so ahead of his time that his discoveries caused him to be the object of persecution and injustice.

Through her whimsical illustrations and her bright engaging text Bendick has provided the middle reader with Galileo’s inspiring story.

About the Author:

Jeanne Bendick, a graduate of Parsons School of Design, is the author and illustrator of many books, primarily in the field of science. Her work has always been distinguished by her remarkable ability to express complex concepts in simple language, and to make difficult subjects interesting and comprehensible to the general reader. Among her many books are Archimedes and the Door of Science, Along Came Galileo, and Galen and the Gateway to Medicine.

Read more about her here.

A Few Reviews:

“Jeanne Bendick has a gift for making science, and scientists, lively. And she uses that gift, in this book, to present Galileo as a curious, interesting, normal person — an excellent role model for little scientists! What made Galileo so normal? Well, he had problems at school — his father wanted him to study things that didn’t interest him. He had money troubles trying to support his family, and he had to relocate for jobs. He got stuck in the middle of a power struggle. He had lots of houseguests, and even took in boarders. He liked to show off (a little). Kids can relate to all of that. What made Galileo extraordinary is the way he never gave up. This book does a fine job demonstrating his pursuit of knowledge, his discoveries, and his inventions. My biggest concern was how the book would treat the church vs. science conflict — it is so often framed as “backwards, repressive church squashes free-thinking genius.” Instead, that conflict is dealt with fairly and honestly. The church was the political power of the day, there were factions, and Galileo was aligned with a faction. The other faction used him as a flashpoint to pick apart the power of his faction, and he was stuck in the middle. I think the most fascinating section of the book dealt with Galileo’s telescope and how he used it to study the night skies. I liked the helpful warning on page 52: NEVER NEVER LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN. Throughout the book, Ms. Bendick’s illustrations are clear and to-the-point. The map on page 6 is very helpful through the whole book. This book brings science to life, and I can’t rate it highly enough.” Amazon Reviewer M. Heiss

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